Window dedicated to Henrietta Browne Clayton. With the words Hope and Faith on them.

Henrietta Clayton grew up at Adlington Hall near Chorley. When her father, Sir Richard Clayton, died in 1828, Henrietta inherited his estates which included Fulwood Hall.

In 1803, Henrietta married Lieutenant General Robert Browne Clayton and they had two children: Richard Clayton Browne Clayton (1806-1886) born in London and Eleanor (1815-1895) born in Cheltenham.

This painting, by Ellen Wallace Sharples, dated 1823, shows Henrietta reading to her daughter Eleanor.

This painting, by Ellen Wallace Sharples, dated 1823, shows Henrietta reading to her daughter Eleanor.

The family were residence at Arlington Hall in 1841. 

Records showing The family were residence at Arlington Hall in 1841

Following the death of her husband Robert, Henrietta took up residence in Clifton Bristol where she died in 1858.

Records showing Henrietta took up residence in Clifton Bristol where she died in 1858.

Henrietta never lived in Fulwood; throughout her life Fulwood Hall was tenanted by a farmer. It was, however, fitting that her family were commemorated in Christ Church as the Claytons had been ‘Lords of the Manor’ in the township for over three hundred years.

Henrietta’s window was the first to be installed at the church. Her son Richard donated £150 to the church building fund and must have had the choice of which window to decorate in memory of his mother. Maybe this one on the north side of the building was the nearest to the family’s ancestral home in Fulwood Hall Lane.

There are no monograms to confirm the designer of this window but it is thought that is may be by William Wailes of Newcastle. It is similar to two windows in Preston Minster by W W, donated by Richard Newsham and John Horrocks, two generous contributors to the Christ Church building fund. Perhaps they recommended William Wailes’ company to Richard Clayton.

Features typical of this maker’s work include the pointed ‘Gothic’ canopies in red and yellow above the passive looking figures of Faith and Hope, and the flat topped number eight. More information can be found in ‘The wonderful windows of William Wailes 1808-81 by Ronald Torbet.